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Friday, February 27, 2015

“Unfinished Business” starring Vince Vaugh, Tom Wilkinson, Dave Franco, Sienna Miller and James Marsden has unashamedly adult themes -  the innocent Mike (Franco) loses his virginity and the jaded Tim (Wilinson), trapped in an unhappy marriage, rediscovers a love for life in the exotic German capital while the relentless Dan (Vaughn) refuses to give up, no matter where his quest takes him.



                “Unfinished Business” is the tale of three hard working guys who are trying to catch a break embarking on what should be a routine business trip out of state who end up thousands of miles from home, in Germany, where everything that can go wrong does so with spectacularly hilarious results.  At first Dan is convinced that the deal is done and heads to Portland, Oregon, confident that it’s in the bag. But once there, he discovers that his old employers, represented by his former boss at Dynamic Systems, the formidable wheeler-dealer Chuck Fortnoy (Miller) are about to steal it from under his nose. 

                Dan, Mike and Tim must head to Berlin to try and save the day, and they arrive in a bustling city hosting a G8 conference and a sex fetish festival with hardly a vacant room left in town. Each of them is about to experience a series of life changing adventures – and setbacks – on a business trip they’ll never forget.



                Franco admits that he was a little nervous at the prospect of starring opposite Vaughn – one of his comedy heroes - who plays his boss desperately trying to secure a deal that will keep his struggling company afloat.   “It’s always intimidating at first to work with someone that you’ve admired for so long,” he says. “I didn’t want to be the person in the scene to slow everything down, but what I quickly realised, working with someone as funny as Vince, is that no matter what I say, no matter how dumb the joke is, Vince will take that dumb joke of mine and turn it into gold.

                The odds may be stacked against Dan, Tim and Mike, but together they find a bond that proves to be unbreakable. “I think with all three of these guys, they are down on their luck but they never feel bad for themselves. They’re fighting as hard as they can, against all odds,” says Franco. 



                For young Mike Pancake – an innocent abroad who has never ventured more than a few miles from his home before – being on the road with the two older, more experienced men gives him the confidence to explore, in every sense of the word. A virgin before he left the States, he proves to be very popular with some of the women he meets in the exotically Bohemian Berlin.  “Yeah, that’s a big part of Mike’s journey, and he’s very successful,” Franco laughs. “Much more so than you might expect from a character who’s never even been out of his home town.

                “He ends up sleeping with multiple women, and I think what they’re attracted to is what we’re talking about: his sincerity and his sweetness. His sexual journey is an entire movie within itself. He’s not only losing his virginity, but he’s trying to do it in a way that would even be risqué for a character in 50 Shades of Grey.”


                “Unfinished Business” is rated R-16 by the local censors board (MTRCB) and will open nationwide in cinemas this March 5 from 20th Century Fox to be distributed by Warner Bros. 

Thursday, February 26, 2015



The official Iron Man poster for Marvel's "Avengers: Age Of Ultron" has arrived. 
#Avengers assemble in Philippine cinemas April 22.




“Birdman” – this year’s big winner at the Oscars that bagged the Best Picture Award which also won the Best Director Award (Alejandro G. Iñárritu), Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki) and Best Original Screenplay Award (by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo) will have a return engagement in (Phils.) cinemas this March 4.


                The widely acclaimed and celebrated “Birdman,” Alejandro G. Iñárritu’s black comedy features Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton) hopes that by spearheading an ambitious new Broadway play he will, among other things, revive his moribund career. In many ways, it is a deeply foolhardy move – but the former cinema superhero has high hopes that this creative gambit will legitimize him as an artist and prove to everyone – and himself – that he is not just a Hollywood has-been.

Movie Review: “Birdman” (or “The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance”)


                With the play’s opening night looming, Riggan’s lead actor is injured by a freak accident during rehearsals and needs to be replaced quickly. At the suggestion of lead actress Lesley (Naomi Watts) and the urging of his best friend and producer Jake (Zach Galifianakis), Riggan reluctantly hires Mike Shiner (Edward Norton) – a loose cannon who is guaranteed to sell tickets and get the play a rave review.  As he preps for the stage debut, he must deal with his girlfriend and co-star Laura (Andrea Riseborough), his fresh-from-rehab daughter and personal assistant Sam (Emma Stone), as well as his ex-wife Sylvia (Amy Ryan), who appears every so often to check-in with the intent to stabilize things.

                Iñárritu notes that elements of Riggan’s story resonated with him, particularly the ephemeral nature of success and the question of relevance. “I was interested in exploring the battles with the ego, the idea that no matter how successful you are, whether in money or recognition, it’s always an illusion. It’s temporary. When you are chasing the things you think you want and empower the people to validate you, when you finally get them, you soon find an impermanence in that joy.”



                From 20th Century Fox to be “Birdman” will return to the big screen at the following cinemas: Robinson’s Ermita, Robinson’s Galleria, Metro East, Gateway, Powerplant and Greenhills.   Follow 20th Century Fox (Philippines) at Facebook for more updates. 
Small town cop Lou Garou hasn't taken his job seriously in years. He drinks too much and when bad things happen he looks the other way.



                One night, acting out of character, Lou follows up on a disturbance call in a remote area, but shortly after he arrives on the scene, he blacks out.  When he wakes up, he can’t remember anything, his senses are heightened, he has odd markings on his body and his hair is growing at a rapid rate.  That night, Lou’s transformation from man into rage-fuelled werewolf takes shape.



                During the day, Lou struggles to remain in control, both of his drinking, his newfound powers and the dangerous situations all around him. In an attempt to uncover the truth, he enlists the help of the town's local eccentric Willie, who seems to know a lot about the werewolf's curse. Together the two work to try and uncover the mystery of who did this to Lou and for what dark reasons.  The only question is will Lou be able to make things right before his inner monster takes control again?

                From Crystalsky Multimedia, “Wolfcop” is now showing in the following cinemas:  SM North Edsa, SM Fairview, SM Marikina, SM Megamall, SM Manila, SM Sta. Mesa, SM Clark, SM Bacoor, SM Cebu, SM Iloilo, Remar Cubao, Cinerama Recto, Gateway Cineplex, Promenade, Sta. Lucia, Gaisano Davao, Gaisano Toril and Fisher Mall. 


Do you remember that scene in Notting Hill, where Hugh Grant’s character goes to see Julia Roberts at her swanky London hotel, not realising she’s in the middle of doing interviews promoting her new film? Embarrassed, he poses as a journalist for Horse And Hound magazine and a series of torturously awkward questions ensue.


In The Rewrite, Grant plays Keith Michaels, a once successful Hollywood scriptwriter forced to take a job lecturing at a university to make ends meet.
“He loves screenwriting, he loves films, he’s desperate to get back into the business,” explains the London-born actor, who has a house in Stinchcombe and famously dated Cotswolds model Liz Hurley before that very public indiscretion with prostitute Divine Brown.

“But he’s just so out of fashion. He’s so ‘cold’ in Hollywood terms, he just can’t get a job. So he has to take this undignified position of teaching screenwriting to a lot of second-rate students in a third-rate university.”
Grant, of course, had his big break in Four Weddings And A Funeral 20 years ago, and has gone on to star in numerous romantic comedies. But he hasn’t become jaded by Hollywood – he claims he always was.


“I’ve always played that... affected that pose anyway. Maybe it’s not a pose,” he says. “There are people who really love showbiz. They get up every morning and they just want to make a film, read a script. I’ve never been that person, I confess.”
So, disillusioned Keith picks all the prettiest young girls to be in his class, indulges in some extra-curricular fun and aims to get away with doing as little work as possible. But in true romcom style, that all changes when single mum Holly, played by Marisa Tomei, signs up as a mature student. She’s determined to have a second chance at life, and convince Keith he can have one too.
“She’s very positive, and my character is very cynical about that,” says Grant. “It’s great that someone like that goes back to university, but can anyone learn to do something that requires talent? No, probably not.
“I do think if you’ve got a little bit of talent, you can learn to make it much better,” he adds.
Following the success of Four Weddings..., Grant went on to play the earnest, bumbling hero several times over, including in the even more successful Notting Hill.
He was a box office hit, the ‘romcom king’, and studios were throwing money at him to do it all over again.
Then in 2002, he played the lead in About A Boy, chopping off his floppy hair to expose a roguish twinkle in his blue eyes. Since then, he’s been the go-to guy for romcoms about a charming but cold-hearted cad.
The Rewrite is his fourth collaboration with writer and director Marc Lawrence, following Two Weeks Notice, Music And Lyrics and Did You Hear About The Morgans?
He insists he’s too old for romantic comedy, but enjoys his collaborations with Lawrence because they don’t require much effort.
“He really is very clever at writing dialogue that’s good for me. The part was written for me, so it wasn’t much of a stretch,” he concedes wryly.


The Rewrite is a reflective film, with Keith looking back to the peak of his success. In one scene, he watches an old video clip of himself making an acceptance speech at an awards ceremony. The footage is doctored from a real speech given by a fresh-faced Grant at the Golden Globes at the beginning of his career. But watching it didn’t stir any sense of nostalgia in the self-confessed “ultra cynic”. “That scene was slightly annoying; they always wanted to use that old footage of me and I didn’t want to do that. For a start, I convinced myself that I was playing a part in this film, and therefore if you see ME with a completely different voice, 20 years ago, it would bring you out of the film,” Grant reveals.
So what has he got out of his 20 year career as a romantic hero?
“I don’t think I’ve learned any particular lesson,” he says, shrugging.
“Except...”, and finally he appears frank, “it certainly always helps if you don’t just go for the money. Especially certain parts in Hollywood, they’re always trying to draw you in just for the money.
“And the other thing is, the more you work at something - even if it’s quite good material already – keep working at it. It can always be better.” Grant’s mistrust of the media is not without reason.
In 1995, he was caught in flagrante with Brown in downtown Hollywood, and the story was splashed all over the tabloids. Broken-hearted Liz Hurley retreated to Sudeley Castle to get over it, but the couple split soon afterwards. His colourful love life – he has reportedly fathered three love children – has since been under constant scrutiny. If Grant was reluctant to become an actor, he was even more reluctant to become a celebrity. Over his two decades in the spotlight, the gossip and intrigue surrounding stars’ lives has intensified. In The Rewrite, one of Keith’s students declares celebrities “the Gods of our time”.
“She might be right that some people think that,” observes Grant, shuddering.
I don’t share that. I’m a little disturbed by celebrity obsession.”
And how does he feel, thinking some people might worship him as a God?
“They would have to be psychotic.”


’THE REWRITE is released and distributed by CAPTIVE CINEMA.
Discovered by film director Guy Ritchie, Jason Statham, 47, has made a name of himself in action films. His latest film is “Wild Card” by Simon West who directed The Expendables 2.




From cockney actor to star of action films such as Wild Card, has your career gone the way you wanted?

The change came with the first Transporter by Luc Besson. I’ve always been quite sporty and kept in shape through competitive diving and martial arts. I was delighted when I was asked to do my first action scenes-all those years of training finally paid off! I really enjoyed it and the films went down well, so I thought it was worthwhile nurturing this talent. In England there aren’t that many ‘physical’ actors.



It’s true that your films are far cry from James Ivory’s productions…

(Laughs) Yes. Not many wigs or cups of tea.

Watch the Official Trailer of Jason Statham's "Wild Card"

Who were your favourite figures in cinema as a teenager?

Sylvester Stallone, with whom I’ve had the great honour of acting. And Michael Caine and Bob Hoskins in England. Have you seen Get Carter and The Long Good Friday? They’re real men’s films; today it’s difficult to find scripts of this quality. I don’t always appear in great films, but you’ve got to eat. It wasn’t really my idea to do action films; it was a lucky break and it doesn’t stop me acting in more scripted films like Snatch and The Bank Job.


At 47, are you now looking for roles in drama films?

In 2013 I played a complex character who emerged from the pits of London in Crazy Joe [Hummingbird aka Redemption] and I prepared the role by having contact with homeless guys and veterans from the Iraqi war. I wanted to have more heavyweight projects, but the phone went one morning and my agent said “I have a role for you in a Hollywood action movie” and I naturally replied “Fine!”



During the making of Expendables 3 you had a near-fatal accident. Are you now much more careful?

It was stupid. Basically I was driving a lorry and swerved to avoid another vehicle and the lorry fell into the sea. I couldn’t get out of the cockpit and up to the surface because I had so much heavy gear on – guns, jacket and boots. I nearly drowned! But these are the hazards of the business; there are always times when things can go wrong. Acting is a combat sport!

First Look Photo and Posters Jason Statham is Nick Wild In WILD CARD


WILDCARD” is released and distributed by CAPTIVE CINEMA.
SHOWING ON MARCH 11.

NATIONWIDE!!!
Once upon a time, screenwriter Keith Michaels (Hugh Grant) was on top of the world – a Golden Globe Award and a hit movie to his name, a beautiful wife and a seemingly inexhaustible supply of wit and charm. But that was fifteen years ago: now, he’s divorced, broke, approaching fifty and hasn’t written a hit film in years. Luckily, his agent has a job for him – a university in the quiet town of Binghamton is looking for someone to teach a course in screenwriting, and with an empty wallet as his motivation, Keith can’t say no. Hoping to give minimal attention to his duties and focus on writing a new script, his attitude slowly begins to turn when he meets Holly (Marisa Tomei). A single mum working two jobs to earn her degree, the pair find themselves connected by their mutual need for a second chance.





Directed by Marc Lawrence and also starring  Allison Janney, J. K. Simmons, Bella Heathcote, and Annie Q.


THE REWRITEis released and distributed CAPTIVE CINEMA

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